Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute

 Academic Programs:

Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering Program

Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Safeguards

Educational Objective

The objective of the Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering is to provide graduate students and professional, non-degree students from various engineering and science departments at MU with a unique opportunity to develop expertise in nuclear engineering that will enhance their job opportunities in the nuclear field.

Requirements for Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering

Students will be required to take the 12 credit hours of coursework from the Nuclear Engineering (NE) degree program curriculum. Co-listed courses with the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute NE classes may be considered towards this requirement. As permitted by the University Policy regarding Graduate Certificate offerings, a maximum of 6 credit hours may be count for both degree course credit within their department and the Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering. However, total credit hours needed to complete their degree need not exceed Departmental or Graduate School requirements. Students will be required to take courses that broaden their knowledge and understanding in nuclear engineering. A student's advisor and graduate committee from the host department and the Graduate Studies Director in the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute will approve the courses.  The selection of courses is restricted 7000 level or above starting and all courses must be successfully completed with a final grade of 'B' or above. Courses must be selected from the list shown in Table 1, below, and documented on the Graduate School’s “Course of Study for Graduate Certificate” form.  Course credit hours for the certificate could also be applied towards the total credit hours needed for the departmental degree requirements, if accepted by the student’s department.

Course Work

Students should take at least one course from each of the three clusters listed in Table 1. The student may choose their fourth course from either Basic Radiation Science Cluster or from the other three clusters. A minimum of 12 credit hours must be documented (using the Course of Study for Graduate Certificate form) in order to qualify for the Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering.  

Graduate Catalog summaries for each of the courses included in the Certificate program are given below, and a syllabus for each of the Nuclear Engineering courses is included in the Appendix.

NE 7303—Radiation Safety (3). Types and origins of radiation; radiation detection and measurement; radiation interactions; shielding; dose calculations; federal, state and local regulations; and procedures for safe uses of radiation. Laboratory experiments in radiation measurements and protection. Prerequisite: college physics, calculus based.

NE 7328—Introductory Radiation Biology (3). (same as Biological Sciences 7328, Radiology 7328, Veterinary Medicine & Surgery 7328).  Concepts of ionizing radiations, their actions on matter through effects on simple chemical systems, biological molecules, cell, organisms, man.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing Sciences/Engineering; one course in Biological Sciences and Physics/Chemistry; or instructor’s consent.

NE 7346—Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Engineering I (3). (same as Electrical Engineering 7030). Engineering principles of nuclear power systems, primarily for the production of electrical energy. Prerequisites: Engineering 1200, 2300, or equivalent; Mathematics 304 or instructor’s consent.

NE 7391—Nuclear Radiation Detection (3). Principles and application of radiation detectors and analyzers: ionization, Geiger-Muller, proportional, liquid and solid scintillation, semiconductor, pulse height analyzers, coincidence circuits, data reduction, tracer applications, activation analysis. Lectures, laboratory. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or instructor’s consent.

NE 8402—Nuclear Fuel Cycle (3). Covers the nuclear fuel cycle from mine through enrichment, fuel element burnup reactor physics, chemical reprocessing, waste disposal, with special emphasis on the newer proliferation-resistant fuel cycles. Prerequisite: NE 7346 or NE 7305, and instructor’s consent.

NE 8404—Nuclear Reactor Laboratory I (3). Application of reactor physics principals to operation of and experiments with the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Neutron activation analysis, instrumentation, reactivity evaluation. Prerequisite: NE 4346/7346 or NE 8411.

NE 8409—Interaction of Radiation with Matter (3). Theory/applications of radiation interaction processes. Reviews nuclear physics concepts; radioactive decay; sources/ spectra of ionizing radiation; collision mechanisms for changed particles, electromagnetic radiation, neutrons for interaction with matter. Prerequisite: Math 7100 or equivalent, Physics 2750 and 2760 or equivalent.

NE 8411—Nuclear Reactor Theory I (3). Nuclear reactions; nuclear fission; introduces neutron transport; diffusion and slowing down of neutrons; steady-state homogeneous and heterogeneous reactor theory. Prerequisite:  NE 7346, or instructor’s consent.

NE 8429—Radiation Dosimetry (3). Basis and applications of conventional and microscopic radiation dosimetry. Dose concepts and quantities; biological dose-response models; dose measurement principles; photon, charged particle, and neutron dosimetry. Prerequisite: NE 8409. Recommended: NE 4328/7328.

PHYS 8200—Nuclear Physics (3).  Properties of nuclei and nuclear radiation, detection methods, high-energy nuclear phenomena.  Prerequisite: PHYS 4800.

NE  8453—Advanced Fusion Theory (3). Plasma stability theory, charged particle diffusion, slowing down of charged particles, interaction of radiation with matter, direct energy conversion using charged particles, and engineering considerations. Prerequisites: NE 4353/7353 and NE 4375/7375, or Physics 8450, or instructor’s consent.

NE 8461—Neutron Transport Theory (3). The Boltzmann equation; general properties and solution; numerical methods of solving the transport equation; neutron thermalization and neutron spectra. Prerequisite: NE 8412, Mathematics 4940/7940, and 4307/7307, or instructor’s consent.

CHEM 8610—Advanced Radiochemistry (3).  Reviews current advances in radiochemistry, hot atom chemistry chemistry, radiation chemistry, nuclear spectrometry.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 8600, or equivalent.

NE 8471—Radiation Protection (3). Theory and applications of radiation protection and health physics. Radiation dosimetry methods and calculations, shielding evaluations, equipment surveys and inspection, environmental monitoring, radiation standards and regulations and administration presented. Prerequisite: NE 4303/7303, and NE 4328/7328 or equivalent.

 

Table 1:  Courses for Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Engineering

Cluster I: Nuclear Engineering

Course #

Course Name

Credit Hours

Semester Offered

NE 7346

Introduction to Nuclear Reactor Engineering I

3

Fall

NE 8404

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory 1

3

Winter

NE 8411

Nuclear Reactor Theory I

3

Winter

NE 8461

Neutron Transport Theory

3

Fall

NE 8402

Nuclear Fuel Cycle

3

Winter

 

Cluster II: Radiation Detection and Dosimetry

Course #

Course Name

Credit Hours

Semester Offered

NE 7391

Radiation Detection

3

Winter

NE 8429

Radiation Dosimetry

3

Winter

CHEM 8610

Advanced Radiochemistry

3

Fall

 

Cluster III: Nuclear and Atomic Physics, and Interaction of Radiation with Matter

Course #

Course Name

Credit Hours

Semester Offered

NE 8409

Interaction of Radiation with Matter

3

Fall

PHYS 8200

Nuclear Physics

3

Winter

NE 8453

Advanced Fusion Theory

3

Fall

 

Cluster IV:  Basic Radiation Science Cluster

Course #

Course Name

Credit Hours

Semester Offered

NE 7303

Radiation Safety

3

Winter

NE 7328

Introductory Radiation Biology

3

Winter

NE 8471

Radiation Protection

3

Winter

 

Graduate Certificate in
Nuclear Safeguards Science and Technology
at the University of Missouri-Columbia

For Additional Information, Contact:
Dr. Tushar Ghosh, Professor of Nuclear Engineering, 573-882-9736, GhoshT@missouri.edu
or Dr. John Gahl, Professor of Electrical Engineering, 573-884-7414, GahlJ@missouri.edu

 

Certificate Objectives and Requirements
The objective of offering the Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Safeguards is to provide graduate students and professional, non-degree-seeking, students in various engineering disciplines with an opportunity to develop unique skills and expertise that will enhance their performance in jobs requiring knowledge of nuclear material protection, control and accountability.

The graduate certificate program serves degree-seeking graduate students and also functions as a stand-alone graduate certificate program for professional, non-degree-seeking students. Both degree-seeking and non-degree-seeking students will be required to take four specific classes (12 credit hours) involving nuclear science, policy and safeguards.  The student must complete a Change of Academic Program form to enter the program.  The student must also complete the “Course of Study for Graduate Certificate” form, which must be approved by NSEI before taking any courses.  Without this prior approval, the NSEI has the authority to deny the certificate.

For MU students, a maximum of 6 credit hours may be counted for both degree course credit within their department and the Graduate Certificate in Nuclear Safeguards.  However, total credit hours needed to complete their degrees need not exceed departmental or Graduate School requirements (see http://gradschool.missouri.edu/policies/graduate-catalog/archive/0708gradcatalog.pdf  or additional information, or contact Dr. Gahl)

Plan of Study
Four specific classes, comprising 12 hours of course credit, are required for a student to receive this graduate certificate in nuclear safeguards:

ECE 7335: Nuclear Safeguards Science and Technology (co-listed as NU ENG 7335)
This course provides an overview of nuclear materials management and safeguards, including physical protection systems, material accounting and control, monitoring and regulatory issues. Prerequisites:  NU ENG 4303/7303.

NE 7331: Nonproliferation Issues for Weapons of Mass Destruction
Nonproliferation and impact on technology and world events.

 

NE 7303: Radiation Safety
Types and origins of radiation; radiation detection and measurement; radiation interactions; shielding; dose calculations; federal, state and local regulations; and procedures for safe uses of radiation. Laboratory experiments in radiation measurements and protection.

NE 7391: Nuclear Radiation Detection
Principles and application of radiation detectors and analyzers: ionization, Geiger-Muller, proportional, liquid and solid scintillation, semiconductor, pulse height analyzers, coincidence circuits, data reduction, tracer applications, activation analysis. Lectures, laboratory.

 


Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute
E2433 Lafferre Hall,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211 (573) 882-8201